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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys I hope you're having a wonderful Friday. I have an O2 Dakota awd drive four door 4.7 sport. I bought some wheels and tires (33"x12.5 on 20's). I also had to have a lug pattern spacer that seems to be about 1 1/2" thick. The tire shop where I bought them said I'd clear them just fine if I got a leveling kit. I bought a kit that came with 3" torsion keys and 2" shackles. When I went to install the keys I found out my truck already had the 3" keys. I installed the front wheels just to see where I stood and found out that there was no way I would clear the 33's. Once again just to see I cranked up the torsion bars until they bottomed out and even though it was close I still couldn't clear them. I'd like to stay away from a body lift if at all possible because I like the stance my truck has now but I know I need to go up to clear the 33's. I don't really do any mudding nor stress my truck much as I live in the city but I do love my truck.
 

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Your options very limited. You can trade your tires for a smaller size, such as a 32 inch or a 31 inch, or you can do the body lift. Due to the rack and pinion steering system your truck is equipped with, there isn't a current suspension lift available for your truck. The torsion bar keys are usually a total waste of money as it's possible to crank up the bars with stock keys to the limits of the suspension, which isn't very much any way.

The other problem you'll likely face will be wheel bearing issues. The wheel bearing on these trucks are known as unit bearings and they require a rim with a specific backspace. To explain it, there are a pair of conical bearings within the unit bearing assembly which are very close together, which means they lack stability if the mass of the tire and rim are not directly over the bearings. A "deep dish" rim (rims with negative offset) places the mass outside the bearing centerline and creates instability which causes the bearings to wear out very quickly. Installing a spacer has the same effect as using deep dish rims, you're placing more mass outside the bearing centerline, and your bearings will wear out much quicker. Believe me, I've had to replace 4 sets of wheel bearings with each costing about $150 ea. My old set up were with 32 Dunlop Mud Rovers on American rims.

If you want a dependable set up save your money. Leave the spacers off and install the 3" body lift. You should be able to purchase the body lift for under $200 and they are easy enough to install yourself. It may not be as desirable as a suspension lift, but in your case, there isn't a suspension lift option.

Ed
 
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