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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've got a pretty common problem with my 2001 Dodge Dakota. It dies when the engine gets hot and won't start again until it cools down. The fuel gauge also goes from full to empty, back and forth over and over. Not rapidly, but every 10 minutes or so. Thinking it was the ECU, I ordered a remanufactured unit that was supposed to be flashed with my VIN from All Computer Resources. Unfortunately, when I install the computer in the truck and hook it up, the truck now gets the infamous NO BUS error on the odometer. The truck still runs though with the new ECU installed. It starts right up, and runs fine.

Items I've replaced:
- Cam shaft sensor
- Crank shaft sensor
- Reman'd ECU


I cleaned out the connecters on the cam and crank shaft sensors with an air compressor to ensure no oil was in them.


I've also run a ground line directly from the negative terminal of the battery directly to the new reman'd ECU. Nothing fixes the error.


I'm going to bring the reman'd ECU to my local dodge dealer and have them verify everything is okay with it.


Other than that, what else should I be checking, considering the old ECU clears up the NO BUS error?


Also, when the old ECU is hooked up, I get error codes P1594 (Charging System Voltage Too High) and P0463 (Fuel Level Sensor Circuit High Voltage). I understand these may be phantom error codes that the old ECU is throwing from it being damaged.
 

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i say you want to eliminate the possibility of the fuel pump harness/connector being damaged. shorting power to your fuel pump.
the pump assembly has fuel level connection and pump power connection,
basically when my dak 4.7's hot. and i pull the fuel pump relay it will shut off instantly ( i have a bad fuel line check valve so ive been in the tank alot)
two easy ways of checking fuel pump is turn key on.. listen for it too "buzz/whir" or check fuel rail pressure at the relief valve during your "hot -no start"
having a multimeter will do wonders to chase down a bad connection.
i have personaly have had pins corrode and break inside the connector above the tank to the pump assembly.
 
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