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Discussion Starter #1
So, we don't have AC. With current 60F weather, things are ok. This summer is La Nina, and I don't doubt we will hit over 100F a few times.

I snagged a AC relay off a junkyard Dak, no change, clutch still as quiet as a rock. I've heard about paperclip skipping the relay, anybody know the numbers to stick them in?

Haven't checked for voltage at the clutch wire, I wanted to try the paperclip first to bypass the refrigerant level circuit. Then voltage checking will be next.

Last but not least will be to check the AC freon level.

Anything else I've overlooked?
 

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Before you bypass the relay, check the pressure.

"Last but not least" is like "I'm a'gonna' rebuild the motor, then check that the tank isn't empty of gas" *grins*

Check the refrigerant FIRST. ALWAYS check it first.

RwP
 

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Discussion Starter #3
R134a conversion

Well duh, of course I've checked the refrigerant. Its totally empty. Like not even a hiss coming out when you hit the pressure release, high or low. This truck has been a long project, thats for sure!

Anyway, so I figured out the terminals to stick the paperclip in, nothing. So obviously there are several other things to check, but as it has been below 0 for a majority of this winter I haven't given it thought one bit.

Regardless, I'm wondering about doing a r134a swap instead, and no one I have talked to seems to know exactly what needs to go into that. Anyone know what parts need to be changed out or exactly how to go about an r134a conversion? Thanks!
 

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Due to it being at atmospheric for a while ...

1) Thermonic expansion valve.

2) Receiver/Dryer

3) I'd consider all new hoses to make sure they're the proper barrier hose.

4) You don't HAVE to, but it will work better if you use a R134a calibrated cycle switch instead of the R12 calibrated one.

5) Get it pressurized with some nitrogen and a dye, and see if you can find the leak,

6) New seals at every junction, of course. Even ones you don't touch in replacing the above.

Since I was doing the heater core about 18 months back, I also did the evaporator and blower motor, and just for grins did the condensor. I then had a failure of the almost-new compressor (well, the snap ring that held the field coil in place *grumbles*) so it took until last year to get the compressor replaced again (no internal damage, but you couldn't engage it). After that, it blows cold air.

Mine was a 1988, so the hoses were over 25 years old on it; that's one reason why I replaced all of them.

RwP
 

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I'm glad I stumbled upon this thread today, I was just thinking about how it's about to be hotter than hell here in Phoenix soon.

Time to overhaul my a/c system.
 

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I'm glad I stumbled upon this thread today, I was just thinking about how it's about to be hotter than hell here in Phoenix soon.

Time to overhaul my a/c system.
Ayep.

When it's all new, it's amazing how cold it can blow.

A side note: Compute how much R134a (70% to 80% of weight of the R12 charge) and weigh the amount going in. That's the IDEAL way to do it on a from-dry never-before-charged point; when recharging, it's better to do the pressures by computing the desired ones vis ambient.

RwP
 
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