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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone, I am looking to paint my rear chrome bumper black. I heard a couple people say to use self-etching primer and then follow with black paint. I also heard to just use the line x style bedding spray for durability but don't know if I want the line x texture look on my bumper. Is the etching primer and paint the best way to go? Yeah, this is going to be rattle can. Thanks for the info!:D
 

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It will have to be roughed up and primed for sure, sandpaper and elbow grease will work a good wipe down before the primer and tacked chrome don' hold paint at all.
 

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if you can try and get a wire wheel on a grinder and hit that chrome your hunna want its scuffed real good then filler primer to fill up your cracks id go over that with a green scuff pad also clean then paint
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys! I will definitely use the tips. I am gonna start that project at the end of the month and see how they run out!
 

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Too bad you're not closer to me,I'd trade a black one for your chrome.! The only thing that I've ever seen stick to a chrome bumper is PPG DP sealer. But you won't get that in a spray can. You need to sand the chrome with 80 grit sand paper,then prime, then paint.
 

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As already mentioned, chrome is difficult to paint over but prepared properly, you can get a really good bond between the chrome and paint. I've had some reasonable success with various etching solutions (self etching primer however, was better than nothing, but not great), but my best success stories have been with "handraulic" (by hand) preparation. One of the most important things to remember before attacking any painted surface with sandpaper (I like the wet-dry, I can use a finer grade and it lasts longer), is to CLEAN the whole surface first REALLY WELL. This keeps the waxes, greases, and oils from getting shoved down into the minor grooves, and once it's ground in, it's really hard to clean out and will give you a poorer quality adhesion. The next thing to keep in mind is that you don't need to see sanding grooves in the surface, you only need to get a completely dull & even look to it before going to the next step - any scratch that you can see will be enhanced, not covered, by the paint. The other steps are pretty straight forward and you can see the whole sequence in this link. The multiple primer coats are essential in my opinion, and the sanding between coats with finer and finer paper will give you a really good base for your paint of choice - just make sure you have compatibility between all the components you use (primer, paint, & sealer if used). Read the application instructions for each component carefully (most rattle can components are fairly easy to use, they're generally designed for people who don't always believe in reading, but the finish won't always be as solid as it could be using other methods - I like a small HVLP gun for jobs like this). For ease of use, I'd recommend a single part components if you can get them - the 2 part stuff can have a very short set time and it's fairly easy to get an inadvertent krinkle finish. If you use the 2 part, use recommended nozzle size and keep within the "set" time window.

I know a lot of this can sound daunting, but it's actually very easy, especially on smaller surfaces such as a bumper. The better the preparation the better the paint job and the less the sheen, the easier it is to hide faults.

Good luck :D
 
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