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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have looked (or, at least CALL myself looking), checked the manual and I still am not sure where it is. I KNOW the general area and I feel duffus, that I haven't located it. So, if someone could tell me where that sucker is, I sure would appreciate it. My truck won't start (again) and I am getting an "11" code, so I was going to swap out the sensor, especially since I already have one. Thank you. ;)
 

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Aww Peg!
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I'm not sure about the v6 but on the 2000 4.7 it was located on the passenger side of the engine block towards the back of the motor in line with the crank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm not sure about the v6 but on the 2000 4.7 it was located on the passenger side of the engine block towards the back of the motor in line with the crank.

I appreciate that, I am told that it is on the passenger side, on mine as well and that I'd need to feel around for it. I, apparently, haven't looked or felt in the right area just yet and just need to keep up my search, til I find it.

the manual gave me basic info, but a picture in there, would have been nice. ;)

Soon as I locate that sucker, I'll see if I can get in position to take a picture and post it. :)
 

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Aww Peg!
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Probably held in place by a bolt with a 10mm head. Just put a little oil on the o-ring to help slip it in place.
 

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I'm not sure about the v6 but on the 2000 4.7 it was located on the passenger side of the engine block towards the back of the motor in line with the crank.
It should be around the same place on the V6 on the Dakota between the transmission bell housing and the engine,
(back at where the crankshaft attaches to the flywheel), because it senses magnetic piston-crank position
"poles" on the flywheel.

It's hard to see and get at from the top of the engine, so you need to remove the right plastic fender splash well
to get at it. It is a hall effect and senses magnetic points on the fly wheel.

Here's one DIY guy (Dave)discovering where it's at ....and repairing it on his 1998 Dakota. I get a kick of his commentary
and he's baffled why the Dakota has a crank sensor when it has a distributor...(laff!)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYlll_SkHog


The Daks have BOTH a crank and cam sensor. Vital timing on the engine crankshaft position, the position of the pistons
and the position of the camshaft are returned to the PCM to determine when the next fuel injection and spark cycle
occurs. These pulses are used to compare real time engine operational data against the stored program reference data in the PCM flash memory, for injector timing and injector duration (pulse width) based on info as well from the oxygen sensors and other sensors on the engine, as well as spark timing at the correct point in the compression cycle of the 4 stroke engines.

Here's the basic theory on crank sensors..
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RuIislTGOwA&feature=related
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It should be around the same place on the V6 on the Dakota between the transmission bell housing and the engine,
(back at where the crankshaft attaches to the flywheel), because it senses magnetic piston-crank position
"poles" on the flywheel.

It's hard to see and get at from the top of the engine, so you need to remove the right plastic fender splash well
to get at it. It is a hall effect and senses magnetic points on the fly wheel.

Here's one DIY guy (Dave)discovering where it's at ....and repairing it on his 1998 Dakota. I get a kick of his commentary
and he's baffled why the Dakota has a crank sensor when it has a distributor...(laff!)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYlll_SkHog


The Daks have BOTH a crank and cam sensor. Vital timing on the engine crankshaft position, the position of the pistons
and the position of the camshaft are returned to the PCM to determine when the next fuel injection and spark cycle
occurs. These pulses are used to compare real time engine operational data against the stored program reference data in the PCM flash memory, for injector timing and injector duration (pulse width) based on info as well from the oxygen sensors and other sensors on the engine, as well as spark timing at the correct point in the compression cycle of the 4 stroke engines.

Here's the basic theory on crank sensors..
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RuIislTGOwA&feature=related

Hey guy, thanks for the input AND the videos. Cool! Now, I just have to get out there and take care of that thing. ;)
 
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