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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not good this i know but how? when i come to a stop the truck will spit and sputter till it dies. A strong odor of fuel at low idle. Like its not burning it fast enough or its dumping to much any suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i was thinkin fuel pressure regulator it aint got one on it and the guy who owned it put a aftermarket fuel pump on it so it is one thing to look into. head gasket? isnt that antifreeze in the oil? not sayin ur wrong but thats what i always thought. learn sumthin new everyday.
 

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Rough idle till it dies sounds like a fuel control problem. I believe it's carbureted.

1. Fuel pressure too high.
2. Carb float level too high.
3. Carb inlet/float valve leaking.

Either way, too much fuel in carbureter delivers too much fuel at idle and the engine can't burn it all. Can you actually smell fuel in the oil on the dipstick if you move away from the truck or is it just a strong smell of unburned fuel in the exhaust from running too rich? i would check the carbureter first. It's easier than pulling the intake manifold.
 

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Rough idle till it dies sounds like a fuel control problem. I believe it's carbureted.

1. Fuel pressure too high.
2. Carb float level too high.
3. Carb inlet/float valve leaking.

Either way, too much fuel in carbureter delivers too much fuel at idle and the engine can't burn it all. Can you actually smell fuel in the oil on the dipstick if you move away from the truck or is it just a strong smell of unburned fuel in the exhaust from running too rich? i would check the carbureter first. It's easier than pulling the intake manifold.
You are right on the money, Peshman.

I would think it has something to do with the electric aftermarket fuel pump that someone put on it. Mechanical fuel pumps don't as a rule develop
much more thant 15 to 20 psi and the float needle can usually deal with that
if the float bowl level is set up. However, stick an electric fuel pump that
can deliver upwards of 40psi..and the float level and float needle will not
be able to seal off the flow of gas, it becomes overwhelmed with too much fuel pressure. Especially if the replaceable float needle and it's replaceable seat are worn.

If he has a carburetor on his vehicle, he needs to put on a aftermarket fuel
pressure regulator after the fuel pump that will cut down the fuel pressure
to about 12 to 15psi at the float needle..and maybe put a kit in the carb
that has a new float needle and seat. A 1987 carb with lots of miles on
it will have lots of wear on the float needle and seat, which move up and
down constantly in reponse to the fuel pump to seal off the flow of fuel
so that the preset float level in the bowl can be maintained.

If the float bowl level is too high..you will get too rich a mixture going into
the idle jets, because the idle jet orfices are setup for a SPECIFIC FLOAT
level in the carb float bowl.

The idle jets can only handle so much fuel. If the float needle can't stop the excessive pressure fuel leakage..well, you know...the excess fuel has to go somewhere and it probably spills out of the bowl causing flooding and the engine to die.

For the engine to run correctly, the fuel air mixture has to be around 14.7 to 1.
You just can't pour fuel into an engine with a "garden hose" and expect it will
run.:D
 
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