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My dakota has a whole slew of engine codes right now. Originally had codes P300, P301, P303 and P305. I've changed plugs, wires, cap and rotar and those codes never went out. I erased them but they came back on.This was about 2 weeks ago.

The last 3-4 days it's been harder to start, turning over for 5-10 seconds before firing up. Yesterday I go to leave work, and it starts, runs for about 20 seconds and as I'm leaving the parking lot it shuts off. This is the first time I've had the P1391 code. (says could be crankshaft position sensor, or timing chain). When I try to start it, it just turns over endlessly.

Any experience with this codes? Could they be related? any help is appreciated. This truck has me banging my head on my desk!
 

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At this point I'd change the CPS. Easy to get to, not very expensive. Did mine in a parking lot in 10 min's. It's on the back of the engine on the passenger side. Got rid of all my 300 codes that were nagging me. It is prone to fail. Do that first, before you get into anything serious (timing chain, etc) in the engine.
 

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as MartyG stated. the CPS would be my next replacement. they have a tendency to fail on our motors for some reason.
the ecm will not know the cranks position when this sensor fails. and the ecm using the cps for the timing and fuel maps. thats why you'll get the random misfires and then no start when the sensor completely fails.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I replaced both the Crankshaft position sensor and camshaft position sensor. Still not start. Last night I tested it for spark and there is none at all.

I guess that leads me to the distributor itself because I've already changed out the wires/cap/rotor.

Any other suggestions?

Any advice on the easiest way to put it in TDC so I can replace the distributor?

Thanks,
 

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you can find TDC is remove the #1 cylinder spark plug and roll the engine over (with a wrench) with a finger covering the plug hole till you feel compression - you're now on the compression stroke. Continue rolling it over by hand lining up the timing Mark on the crank pulley with the timing indicator TDC Mark. Make a mark on your distributor base at the #1 plug tower so when you pull your cap you can see where your rotor is point in relation to where number 1 was - if it's way off you can investigate other engine issues.
 
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