Dakota Forumz banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I know I may seem crazy to the experts for asking but why not. I want to run some cal-trac bars and while on there site I noticed they have mobiles springs for our trucks and they aren't much more than regular ole replacement leafs. So I was like hmm. Now my mind is thinking that mono springs are pretty much a linear rate spring meant to preload and release all that power to help launch a vehicle forward in a drag race only setting. Makes sense to me but hoping I'm just over thinking this. Only reason why I am even considering this "upgrade" is I want to replace and refresh my old suspension including all new springs and shocks since my truck bounces like a dodgeball in any situation that's not a smooth road. But also doing so I want traction bars/ cal-trac bars. Front and rear anti sway bars since my truck doesnt even have a front anti sway bar. I want to improve handling but be also to launch it once in awhile. I will say dirt roads are fun as is cause I can drift all the corners with pretty good control. I live on Indian reservation so we have nothing but dirt roads so alot of dirt drifting. Lol and no I am not native American. Boom, mind blown.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
403 Posts
Here's the problem I see, each suspension "upgrade" is usually designed around what aspect of performance you want to enhance.

The combination of those Caltrac bars and mono spring are designed primarily for drag racing, and they'd probably do great for that. However you're telling me that you'll be driving on a wide variety of road conditions and handelling situations. Also since we are talking about a truck, we should also consider payload capability. I believe you're picking the wrong suspension for this. You need a suspension to handle paved and dirt roads alike, and probably an occasional load. The best suspension is the one you already have under your truck. Now it's probable that it's worn out since it's under an older first gen Dakota, so I'd start with having all the bushings checked and replaced. Use a new set of shocks, have the leaf springs inspected for corrosion and damage. If you want to install sway bars, it can be done.

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, I am replacing the whole suspension. I was just saying when I looked at Caltech bars I noticed they had mono leafs so just wanted to ask about them since every thing I read said tjery would make the rear really stiff compared to OEM type leafs so I figured if it made the rear stiffer wouldn't actually make the payload higher. I found OEM springs which I planed on going but just ran into those mono ones which got me interested that's all and from what I hear Caltech won't have any draw backs on the street so was thinking that would be a worthwhile upgrade if I want to take it to the strip once in awhile. 100% sure I'm gonna replace all springs, shocks, bushings and ball joints and gonna atleast add a sway bar to the front. 70% sure on the rear sway bar since it seems like a rear pain in the butt. My goal really on this truck is to build a fun truck that's still has a use somewhat as a truck. Basically build it like dodge would have built it if they made a 1st gen Dakota with a R/T package but a tad better. I have noticed alot of upgrades people want to do on there 1st gens on here dodge made factory on 2nd gen r/t package anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
403 Posts
Yeah, I am replacing the whole suspension. I was just saying when I looked at Caltech bars I noticed they had mono leafs so just wanted to ask about them since every thing I read said tjery would make the rear really stiff compared to OEM type leafs so I figured if it made the rear stiffer wouldn't actually make the payload higher.
Stiffer springs will work for drag racing and cornering on pavement, but they are going to suck on dirt roads and have limited suspension travel. "Stiff" doesn't necessarily mean higher payload either. If you look at a set of factory leaf springs, you can see that they use multiple leaves. Theres a reason why there are several leaves. The short ones on the bottom are the portion that carries the loads. The long ones on the top are designed to ride smooth. When there is no load to carry, the bottom springs aren't really in play. But as weight increases, the springs sag and begin to make contact with these shorter load carrying springs. The combination of all the springs offers a progressive smooth to firm ride vs load carrying ability. It's not easy to make a single leaf do it all (Unless you switch to a parabolic leaf spring) Since the Caltrac design is intended for performance, it's probably going to suffer in load carrying and the stiffness will suck on dirt roads

I found OEM springs which I planed on going but just ran into those mono ones which got me interested that's all and from what I hear Caltech won't have any draw backs on the street so was thinking that would be a worthwhile upgrade if I want to take it to the strip once in awhile.
The Caltracs should do as advertised. It's a lightweight layout that should allow the rear end to hook up well…for drag racing. For something expected to be a driver and hauler, the OEM springs will be better. There are a few things you can do with the OEM springs to improve performance without giving up too much for other duties. Install polyurethane bushings will help firm up the ride without firming up the springs. Lower the suspension a bit. Add a traction bar and go with good quality shocks, that should give you a good all around suspension system

Ed
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top