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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for the splash guard or skid plate that goes under the vehicle to protect the engine. I can't find them anywhere, was wondering if anyone made there own and if they did how? Mine was gone when I bought the truck and when I get water up on the belts I lose power steering. It has been raining a lot and I'm on the street, not off road. Any websites or home jobs? Could not find any posts about this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, The nearest one to me is an hour away so I don't get out to them very often. I guess I'll have to make a trip
 

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I have not seen any splash guards for our trucks. There are two skid plates, one for the transfer case and one for the fuel tank. They do not protect from water though, maybe just a little bit, but water still gets splashed up there pretty good.

Transfer case skid plate



Fuel tank skid plate, which has been discontinued.
 

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I usually make my own splash guards, for the same reasons you have. The last one I did for my Dakota was made out of a piece of diamond plate aluminum.

For the Dakota, I wanted the splash shield to cover the space under the front of the engine from the bumper to the engine/suspension crossmember, and as wide as the distance between the frame rails. This will prevent water from splashing up between the radiator and engine, and keep the belts from slipping. So I measured the size that the piece needed to be. Attaching it is a matter of using existing holes and a bit of fabrication.

To attach the shield at the bottom, you can see that the crossmember has two large holes at each end. These holes allow tool access to the A arm bolts. Inboard of these two big holes are smaller holes. I used these smaller holes to bolt the lower part of the shield to the crossmember, but to create access to tighten the nut, I made a pair of large holes which matched the same location to the access holes on the crossmember, then I just reached in with a box end wrench to tighten the nut and bolts

To attach the top of the shield, required a bit of fabrication. You'll note that on the frame, near the bumper, there are a number of square holes on the sides of the frame rails. Some of those holes are used to bolt the bumper brackets to the frame and have threaded inserts in them. You can work off one of these holes or make a new hole. In my case, my Dakota had a 3" body lift and the bumpers were moved up a corresponding amount, which left the lower holes with their threaded inserts available. So all I did was build a couple of simple "L" brackets and bolted the brackets to the frame, using the existing hole and insert, and then I bolted the brackets to the shield.

I can say that it worked pretty darn good, just make sure that the shield doesn't hang down below the crossmember, because it could snag something if you are backing up.

Ed
 
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