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What oddball aftermarket part would you like to see made?

  • EGR Block Off Plates

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • True Cold Air Intakes

    Votes: 5 26.3%
  • Throttle Body Upgrades

    Votes: 4 21.1%
  • Performance Injectors for SFI/TBI

    Votes: 2 10.5%
  • Longtube Headers for V6 3.7/3.9

    Votes: 5 26.3%
  • Turbocharger Kits

    Votes: 3 15.8%
  • Supercharger Kits

    Votes: 2 10.5%
  • Performance Heads 2.5/3.7/3.9/4.7

    Votes: 4 21.1%
  • Camshafts

    Votes: 3 15.8%
  • Stroker Crankshafts

    Votes: 4 21.1%

  • Total voters
    19
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

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Discussion Starter #1
From heat risers on valve covers, to Phantom Grip LSD upgrades, what would be a great idea to have made?
 

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Judging by the electrical problems I see here; I'd buy a complete set, bumper-to-bumper, of heavy-duty wiring harnesses.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
From the selection, a TRUE CAI would help the engine. If I don't find a true CAI, I'll have to build one lie on the diesels I've owned.
Custom built one will most likely be the best choice. Finding a true CAI will be hard, let alone expensive. I think the best route to go would bring the vehicle to an exhaust shop and get 3" aluminum pipe bent up with bungs for PCV tubing.
 

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There is a write up in a Diesel forum, there a guy has a flex hose connected to the air box via pluming fixtures, that reaches to the lower part of the front fender. The cost is less than $100.00, but over $50.00. Been looking for that write up to see if that will fit in my engine compartment. Since the original inlet is from the fender and not from inside the hot engine compartment, it would be a true CAI, with minimal cost and still using the original filter.
 

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I spent a good chunk of change on a CAI for my 06,the only change I noted was a lighter Wallet,the company I bought it from had a foam element like Briggs&Stratton used to use,the cheap bunch didnt even include any extra oil to reoil the element after it got dirty and was cleaned,so I wasnt about to spend a wad of cash on special oil,so I trashed the foam and put a stock panel filter back in(if anything it did better) so Guys, my opinion of these wallet depleters is at a low-just like the super turbo muffler(good tone) after it rusted off,I put the stock muffler back on,seemed to run just as good(crappy sound though) one thing through the years,I have noticed-Mopar seemed to always have a fairly free flowing exhaust for more on the exhaust business I would suggest the Books by John Ligenfelter.Under most situations the most gain from modified exhaust,would be if it was restricted and it actually took power to pump the exhaust gases out,extraction basically works on tuned and modified engines,put your money in a good tuneup or if you like the racket,get a muffler that is straight through or has few baffles(one hint on the exhaust though-it shouldnt hiss) a good set of light alloy wheels and low rolling resistance tires should improve acceleration and fuel economy.
As always,do as you like and enjoy the ride,remember the factory setups have been developed to a pretty good default level,just my two cents. Any other thoughts on bang for the buck?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Generally a decent bang for the buck, depending on what kind of intake you put on initially, in comparison to the stock intake, would usually do well. The K&N/AIRAid/AirHog/AEM intakes are way too expensive for how much 'more' horsepower they actually give. Most of them are your standard Short Ram Intake anyway that still take in warm/hot air from the engine bay. Utilizing the cooler air from outside of the bay or having a heat shield between the filter and the engine does a bit better, and wrapping the intake would do even more to enhance the horsepower/torque figures (though still be looking at a minimal gain). Best bang for the buck would be making an intake while still using the stock air filter box. You would get the best of both worlds; smooth airflow from an aluminum pipe coming from a great OEM paper filter that is shielded from heat by the air box. Toss on an intake sock and you'd be good to go.

Exhaust would be next, of course, for adding horsepower. The OEM press bent exhaust is press bent for a reason; saves money. The diameter of the pipe is kept smaller as well to keep the emissions lower/MPG higher/sound lower, whatever reason, pick one. Getting larger diameter pipe, mandrel bent, header back to a high-flowing muffler will help immensely in any application for horsepower increase. Just don't go too big on the piping diameter or you'll lose horsepower/torque.

Overall, just doing a tune-up will help a lot. Use full synthetic oils everywhere; engine, transmission, transfer case, differentials.

Lower degree thermostat can help some, like the old 70's muscle cars used to do, but it may not do anything now besides just trip a code.

Want an increase in horsepower? Get the ECU flashed by a good performance shop. ~$300 for a flash and +15 horsepower keeping your MPG stock is a good investment.
 

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I'd add a PCM that 1) will accept an OEM-type cruise control and 2) will address the many TSBs about the torque converter shudder/vibration from 35 to 50 mph. Yes, electrical problems could be bound into a book the size of a dictionary.
 

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id like to see the kits to do different engine and trans swaps. ive been wanting to do a 5.3 swap ( i know, i know) but building motor mounts and such is scaring me off the idea. even older big block mopar stuff would be cool to see.
 

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id like to see the kits to do different engine and trans swaps. ive been wanting to do a 5.3 swap ( i know, i know) but building motor mounts and such is scaring me off the idea. even older big block mopar stuff would be cool to see.
Motor mounts I can do!
let me know
Ken
 
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